Look - by: Sergey Pesterev

earthcats:

Bengal Tigers by Elliot Neep

Cheetah (by Cloudtail)

llbwwb:

(via 500px / Snow Leopard by Steve Mackay) used with permission


bigcatrescue:

3 Tigers Rescued from NY “Sanctuary”

Big Cat Rescue saved 3 starving tigers from a New York “sanctuary” after they lost their USDA license and the animals were confiscated by the Sheriff’s Department… There are an estimated 10,000 - 20,000 privately owned big cats in the USA, cubs bred to be used as photo props and then sold as “pets” confined to tiny backyard cages, killed for their body parts and exotic meat trade or bounced around between different facilities.

Please HELP us stop this abuse by taking a minute to support the Big Cats and Public Safety Protection Act: https://www.votervoice.net/BCR/Campaigns/30111/Respond

Read the entire rescue story here: http://bigcatrescue.org/jnk/

Please donate towards the care of these cats here:http://www.razoo.com/story/Nytigers

Subscribe for future updates on Keisha, Kimba and Zeus!

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT! :)

There is currently a debate going on about whether or not the forestry department in Ranthambhore should stop providing food for Machli. Apparently, they were ordered to stop in March by the NTCA, and that Machli has been surviving on her own ever since. For those of you who don’t know, Machli is nearly 18 years old, and has lost all of her canine teeth. Despite her ability to still hunt small animals, lizards and birds, she has, for the past four years, occasionally been provided with carcasses.

I agree that they should never have started feeding her in the first place, but that is in the past and not the problem at hand. In saying that, I don’t blame them for what they did, Machli is not an animal I could’ve just left for dead either. It’s now being argued that she’s taking up space, and that it’s inhumane to put her through old age. Whilst she does still live in Ranthambhore, she no longer holds prime territory and has been confined to the very outskirts of the park by males and breeding females. Food is still able to sustain and nourish her, to the point where she can still hunt for herself. Obviously we can’t keep on feeding her forever, but cutting her off completely and leaving her to die does seem a bit drastic.

Machli will die one day, but it absolutely cannot be by our own doing. I’m very open about this subject, but I think exceptions are needed because of her history. Machli does not always feed on the food she is supplemented with, which still suggests stable independence on her part. I know the park is becoming increasingly productive with the populations beginning to rise, but Machli will never become redundant, especially to those who love and admire her.

Valkmik is being opposed by a non-profit organisation called Cee4life. They’re heading over to India in a week’s time, and you can donate via PayPal to their cause if you agree with them. I really do hope that all the pros and cons are weighed and that they can come to a decision that serves her best interests. Machli is a national icon, and is dubbed as one of the greatest tigers to ever walk the planet. Her resilience, unique power and beauty has generated over 500 million dollars to India’s tourism, and she’s provided the park with numerous lineages for the continuation of her species. Towards the end of their lives, B2 and Charger of Bandhavgarh National Park, were cared for in different ways by the forestry department, so Machli should also be given the same kind of chances to live out the rest of her life peacefully. 


big-catsss:

(by Mitsuaki Iwago)

beautiful-wildlife:

Look into my eyes by Ingo Knuth


beautiful-wildlife:

Kalahari Lions by Ken Watkins

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